St Patricks Day Fact or Fiction Game Printable

Grab this free St Patricks Day Fact or Fiction game printable and have some fun celebrating with the kids on St. Patrick’s Day.

We haven’t shared much about St. Patrick’s Day, but my goal is to start sharing more educational projects and activities. Learning about the history and traditions of St. Patrick’s Day can be great lessons for kids as they celebrate the holiday.

For younger kids, these Shamrock CVC Word Families Activity will make a great St. Patrick’s Day activity!

St Patricks Day Fact or Fiction Game

St Patricks Day Fact or Fiction Game Printable

This year I wanted to do something fun and something that kids can use to learn more about St. Patrick’s Day.

I also wanted to give them some information that would spark their interest and possibly lead to them doing more research on their own.

So, this St Patricks Day Fact or Fiction Game was created.

The St Patricks Day Fact or Fiction Game Printable includes 12 different cards. Each has a fact or fiction statement on it. Cut the cards and have the kids see if they can tell which statements are true or false.

Ways you can use the printable St Patricks Day Fact or Fiction Game:

  • Have the kids research each fact or fiction statement. While we’ve included a lot of information below that you can print, this will be a great opportunity to have them do more research on their own.
  • Pair it with a St. Patrick’s Day word search and a St. Patrick’s Day craft to create a lesson.
  • Use these as St. Patrick’s Day writing prompts.
  • Have the kids create a report on St. Patrick’s Day using some of these topics.
Fact or Fiction Game St Patricks Day

1. Fiction: In 1924, St. Patrick’s Day became an official Irish public holiday.

St. Patrick’s Day became an official Irish public holiday in 1903. Before it became an official holiday, it was strictly a holy day for Catholics.

2. Fact: The 3 leaf clover (shamrock) was believed to be a sacred plant that symbolized the arrival of spring.

Fact: The Shamrock plant has been around for centuries and is one of the most recognizable symbols of St. Patrick’s Day today. The Celts believed the 3 leaf clover to be a sacred plant that symbolized spring was arriving.

3. Fact: In England, there is a giant ferris wheel that turns green to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day.

The London Eye, which is located in England and was created in 2000, turns green every year to celebrate the holiday. While many refer to it as a ferris wheel, the real name of it, and preferred terminology, is a cantilevered observation wheel.

4. Fiction: The first St. Patrick’s Day Parade was held in Ireland.

Even though St. Patrick’s Day has been celebrated and associated with Ireland for centuries, the first St. Patrick’s Day parade started in America (St. Augustine, Florida). It wasn’t until the early 1900s that Ireland had its first St. Patrick’s Day parade.

5. Fact: Corned beef and cabbage is a traditional dish served at America’s St. Patrick’s Day celebrations.

The tradition of eating corned beef and cabbage on St. Patrick’s Day started in America. Ham and cabbage was the traditional dish served in Ireland, but because corned beef was cheaper, it was served instead of ham.

6. Fact: Maewyn Succat was the real name given to Saint Patrick’s.

Yep, Maewyn Succat was his original name. It wasn’t until he became a bishop that he changed his name to St. Patrick. The name Maewyn Succat comes from the Latin root meaning father.

7. Fiction: Green was the color that was most associated with St. Patrick.

Blue was most associated with St. Patrick and you’ll notice him wearing the color blue in all surviving artworks and renderings of him. Irish immigrants who made their way to America began wearing green and carrying the Irish flag. Over the years green became the featured color and was adopted as the national color.

8. Fiction: St. Patrick was born in Ireland.

Slavery is what brought St. Patrick to Ireland. When St. Patrick was 16, he was kidnapped and sold as a slave where he herded sheep for many years. He eventually escaped and returned to Ireland.

9. Fiction: St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated on St. Patrick’s birthday.

St. Patrick died on March 17, 461 A.D. The annual holiday of St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated on the day of his death.

10. Fact: The Irish flag colors represent the Roman Catholics, the Protestants, and Peace between them.

The national colors of the Ireland flag are orange, white, and green. These colors were used to symbolize the unity and peace (white) of Catholics (green) and Protestants (orange).

11. Fact: According to Irish tradition, the three leaves of a shamrock represent the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost.

Irish legend says that St. Patrick used the three-leaf clovers to explain the Christian belief of the Holy Trinity (the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost) to nonbelievers.

12. Fact: The famous phrase “Erin go bragh” means “Ireland forever.”

The famous phrase “Erin go bragh” translates to “Ireland till doomsday” aka “Ireland forever”. It’s an expression of loyalty and devotion from the late 18th-century Irish rebellion against the British.

Free Fact or Fiction Game St Patricks Day Printable

Use this St Patricks Day Fact or Fiction game in your homeschool for some educational fun. You can also the printable game as a family activity to celebrate the holiday!

Download it here

See more educational holidays that you can incorporate into your homeschool.

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